Popular Science article on the Sten Gun (2 of 2)

Popular Science article on the Sten Gun (2 of 2)

Popular Science article on the Sten Gun (2 of 2)

A September 1943 Popular Science article on the Sten Gun. (Source: http://aa-ok.com/gun-gallery-p2)


Guns of Star Wars (Not Really From a Galaxy Far, Far Away)

The “final” film in the Star Wars saga, The Rise of Skywalker, came out last December, concluding the sequel trilogy. The cultural impact of these films can’t be understated. Perhaps one of the things that made Star Wars so accessible was in its approach to science fiction.

It featured a classic tale of good vs. evil – that borrowed heavily from American westerns, war films, and notably the samurai epic The Hidden Fortress by director Akira Kurosawa. Unlike other sci-fi films of the era that featured “futuristic” looking costumes, disco-inspired music, and ray guns, Star Wars offered costumes that were seemingly retro yet militaristic. The musical score was bombastic yet classically inspired and had very realistic looking weapons.

One factor that played into the realism of the arsenal of Storm Trooper weapons, Han Solo’s infamous blaster, and countless other guns is that these were in fact dressed up weapons from our world! Here is a look at how modern – and not so modern – firearms were dressed up in the Star Wars films.

They have infinite capacity endless assault mags too!


  • Author : Frank Iannamico
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date : 2016-07-08
  • Genre: History
  • Pages :
  • ISBN 10 : 0982391889

There have been many books written on submachine guns but this one somewhat differs from those previously published. The book includes a brief history of the Sten, but it focuses mainly on the Sten's use by modern shooters. Explained herein are tips on how to keep your Sten in top shooting condition: troubleshooting of problems, maintenance, wear points, spare parts, and the many accessories and parts available to enhance or improve the British Sten submachine gun.


Bibliography

The Sten Machine Carbine, P. Laidler, (2000)
R.O.F. – The Story of the Royal Ordnance Factories, 1939-1948, I. Hay, (1949)
The Other Battle, D.M. Ward, (1946)
The Sterling Submachine Gun, M.J. Moss, (2018)
The Sten Gun, L. Thompson, (2012)
‘Sten & Bren Guns’, Know Your Weapon #5, (Oct. 1942)
‘The Sten Carbine’, Model Engineer, 3 Jun. 1943, H.J. Turpin
Board of the Royal Commission Awards to Inventors – 1946-49
‘Machine Guns From Backyard’, Popular Mechanics, Oct. 1943

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Soviet Union

More so than any other major combatant, the Russians faced an existential threat from the Nazis. Operation Barbarossa, the largest military invasion in human history, saw some three million Axis troops invade the Soviet Union in the summer of 1941 over an 1,800-mile front. With its national survival on the line, the Russians churned out submachine guns like their very lives depended upon it.

The Russian PPSh-41 offered massive close-range firepower. Shown with Tokarev pistol in matching 7.62x25mm chambering.

Though the Soviets ultimately used several SMGs, it was the PPSh-41 that became a national icon. Designed by Russian small arms designer Georgy Shpagin, this 7.62x25mm bullet hose was called the “papasha” by those who used it. This loosely translates as “Daddy.”

The selective-fire PPSh-41 orbited around a simple pressed steel receiver and one-piece wooden buttstock. The gun fed from either a curved 35-round stick magazine or a 71-round drum. The Soviets eventually equipped entire battalions with this fast-firing weapon. With a cyclic rate of around 900 rpm, the PPSh was a fearsome close-quarters tool.

When fed from a 71-round drum, this fast-firing burp gun helped save the Soviet Union from ruin.

The Soviets produced around six million copies, and the gun remained in service in some of your less well-funded war zones well into the 1970s. The PPSh is awkward to carry and, in my opinion, unpleasant to shoot. I find the rate of fire to be a bit fast for my tastes, and the gun is notorious for ejecting straight up and dropping empties on top of your head.


The World Factbook: 1987

By: Central Intelligence Agency

Full Text Search Details
. abor: government-controlled unions are being established Government Official name : Democratic Republic of Afghanistan Type: Communist regime backed by. . agriculture, 40% industry and commerce, 38% other (1978) Government Official name : People's Socialist Republic of Albania Type: Communist state Capita. . on and is subordinate to the National Libera- tion Front Government Official name : Democratic and Popular Republic of Algeria Type: republic Capital: . . eracy: 100% Labor force: largely shepherds and farm- ers Government Official name : Principality of Andorra Type: unique co-principality under formal s. . ture, 15% industry Organized labor: about 450,695 (1980) Government Official name : People's Republic of An- gola Type: Marxist people's republic Capit. . ources: bauxite, coal, iron ore, copper, tin, silver, uranium, nickel, tung- sten , mineral sands, lead, zinc, diamonds, natural gas, oil Agriculture: .

Our Mutual Friend

By: Charles Dickens

Full Text Search Details
. n not in use, to whom the Veneerings were a source of blind confusion. The name of this article was Twemlow. Being first cousin to Lord Snigsworth, he. . and winds it all up to his own perfect satisfaction by saying to the last- named , ‘Ridiculous opportunity—but so glad of it, I am sure!’ Now, T wemlow. . the false wretch from this moment, and I strike him out of my Cupidon (my name for my Ledger, my dear,) this very night. But I am resolved to have th. . by fixing him with a local habita- tion, but he comes from the place, the name of which escapes me, but will suggest itself to everybody else here, w. . else in preference. ‘The man,’ Mortimer goes on, addressing Eugene, ‘whose name is Harmon, was only son of a tremendous old rascal who made his money . . staring after the equipage, were many youthful spirits, who hailed it in sten - torian tones with such congratulations as ‘Nod-dy Bof-fin!’ ‘Bof-fin’.

Our Mutual Friend

By: Charles Dickens

Full Text Search Details
. n not in use, to whom the Veneerings were a source of blind confusion. The name of this article was Twemlow. Being first cousin to Lord Snigsworth, he. . and winds it all up to his own perfect satisfaction by saying to the last- named , ‘Ridiculous opportunity—but so glad of it, I am sure!’ Now, T wemlow. . the false wretch from this moment, and I strike him out of my Cupidon (my name for my Ledger, my dear,) this very night. But I am resolved to have th. . by fixing him with a local habita- tion, but he comes from the place, the name of which escapes me, but will suggest itself to everybody else here, w. . else in preference. ‘The man,’ Mortimer goes on, addressing Eugene, ‘whose name is Harmon, was only son of a tremendous old rascal who made his money . . staring after the equipage, were many youthful spirits, who hailed it in sten - torian tones with such congratulations as ‘Nod-dy Bof-fin!’ ‘Bof-fin’.


Mess with it in Photoshop

(The comparison above show two versions of the same image. The one on the right has been subjected to the levels adjustments that clearly show brush adjustments over the front license plate)

If you have access to Photoshop yourself, there are a few adjustments you can make to try and draw out artifacts that you might miss with your naked eye.

One tool Farid suggests using is Levels. You can access this by pressing Command + L (Mac) or Control + L (PC). “If you bring the white point all the way down really close to the black point, what’s going to happen is that the narrow range of black will expand out quite a bit,” says Farid. “If somebody has taken the eraser tool and erased something in a dark area, you can see the traces of the tool.” The same effect happens if you drag the black point all the way up to draw more detail out of the image highlights.

You can try a few other Photoshop tricks to shed some light on alterations. Cranking up the contrast or the sharpness will help emphasize hard edges in the photo, which can sometimes occur when an object is pasted in. Farid also suggests inverting the colors on an image (control + I or command + I) to get a new perspective on the photo, which could jolt your brain into drawing out some irregularities.


M1 Garand Rifle: $83 (1942) / $31 (1945)

The M1 Garand rifle is a 0.30 caliber semi-automatic US rifle designed in 1928 by Canadian-American firearms designer John Garand. It was in service as the standard US service rifle from 1936 to 1957. Thousands of these rifles were also lent or supplied to the allies of United States as foreign aid.

The M1 was still in use in large numbers until 1976 and today it is mainly used for drill purposes or by collectors. From 1936 to 1957 and in the 1980s total 6.25 million M1 Garand rifles were produced and per unit cost was $85 during WWII.


How to make a mask

Let’s make this clear: masks, no matter how effective, are not guaranteed to protect you from COVID-19.

“A mask is only ever as good as the wearer, and isn’t a replacement for social distancing and good hand hygiene,” says Anna Davies, one of the researchers in the Public Health England study.

And good hygiene extends to cloth masks, too. Everyone, especially those taking care of a sick loved one, should have at least a couple so they can sterilize one while wearing the other.

Our tutorial is a simple project for people who don’t have a sewing machine, adapted from MakerMask by Helpful Engineering, a global open-source COVID-19 project. While many projects call for cotton, Davies says there’s no indication it is better or worse than other fabrics—it’s just comfortable and something people tend to have on hand.


This is how we save lives from gun violence

Those who oppose reforms say nothing can be done. That's demonstrably wrong.

For far too long, those who oppose gun reforms have said that nothing can be done to stem the violence.

Those claims are demonstrably wrong. Research on gun violence is notoriously underfunded, but the data we do have shows that lawmakers can act to save lives from gun violence.

Thousands of people will descend on the Mall this week to protest gun violence in the United States. This movement should be informed by science, with specific policy proposals that could make a real impact.

The Las Vegas massacre. The massacre at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando. The movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colo. The Virginia Tech slaughter. The massacre at the Texas First Baptist Church.

These are the five highest-casualty mass shootings in modern American history. And what did they all have in common? Semiautomatic weapons that allowed the shooter to fire into crowds without reloading.

Based on the evidence we have, banning these weapons probably won’t do too much to curb overall gun deaths. We know this because in 1994, Congress passed legislation to outlaw the sale of certain types of semiautomatic guns and large-capacity magazines, and the effect was unimpressive. Gun homicide rates declined during the ban, but they also fell after the ban expired in 2004. One federally funded study of the ban found that the effect on violence was insignificant, partly because it was full of loopholes.

Death tolls include victims killed by shooters within a day of the main shooting, including any who were killed in another way. Totals also include people who later died from injuries received during the shootings. 2018 data through March 21.

Source: Mother Jones Washington

Post mass shooting database

Mass shooting fatalities in the U.S.

Death tolls include victims killed by shooters within a day of the main shooting, including any who were killed in another way. Totals also include people who later died from injuries received during the shootings. 2018 data through March 21.

Source: Mother Jones Washington Post mass shooting database

But banning so-called assault weapons was never meant to reduce overall gun deaths. It was meant to reduce gun deaths from mass shootings — even if these represent a small portion of gun violence.

And in fact, mass shooting casualties dipped during the ban, although a review of studies by the Rand Corporation found the effect of the ban on mass shootings to be inconclusive. We need to know more.

But research shows that semiautomatic weapons and weapons with high-capacity magazines are more dangerous than other weapons in shooting events. One older study of handgun attacks in New Jersey shows that gunfire incidents involving semiautomatic weapons wounded 15 percent more people than shootings with other weapons. Another more recent study from Minneapolis found that shootings with more than 10 shots fired accounted for between 20 and 28 percent of gun victims in the city.

So how do we keep such dangerous weapons from being used in crime? A ban on assault weapons might help, as data from a few cities during the 1994 ban suggest:

Assault weapons as a share of guns recovered by police at crime scenes

Time periods for data for each city vary based

on when data was collected.

Source: Christopher Koper, 2004

National Institute of Justice study

Assault weapons as a share of guns recovered by police at crime scenes

Time periods for data for each city vary based on when data was collected.

Source: Christopher Koper, 2004 National Institute of Justice study

But experts say focusing on reducing large-capacity magazines might be more effective. Simply put, gunmen are less deadly when they have to reload.

Such a ban might take time to have an effect, as a Post investigation shows. But it would be worth it. Alarmingly, local crime data suggest that crimes committed with high-powered weapons have been on the rise since the 1994 ban ended.

Again, mass shootings account for a small piece of the puzzle, so any ban on these weapons and magazines would result in marginal improvements, at best. But even if this step reduced shootings by 1 percent — far less than what the Minneapolis study suggests — that would mean 650 fewer people shot a year. Isn’t that worth it?

Recently, we’ve heard proposals to raise age limits for semiautomatic weapons. Taken alone, this would do very little. Since 2009, men under 21 committed two mass shootings with semiautomatic rifles. And one of those shootings involved a gun purchased illegally.

But expanding existing age limits to all guns might be more effective, since young people are far more likely to commit homicide than older ones. One survey of inmates found that setting a minimum age requirement of 21 could have prohibited gun possession in 17 percent of cases in which people legally owned a gun and used it to commit a crime.

Of course, keeping guns out of the hands of young shooters would be difficult, because it’s so easy for people to obtain guns illegally. But age limits in general have proven to be effective in limiting bad behavior, so it’s worth trying.

There’s another reform that could be even more effective at keeping guns from kids: requiring gun owners to securely store firearms in a locked container or with a tamper-resistant mechanical lock.

Nearly 2 million minors in the United States live in homes where firearms are loaded and easy to access. And alarmingly, one study found that of the teens who had guns in their home who had attempted suicide in the past year, 40 percent had easy access to the firearm. Another study from the federal government shows that 68 percent of school shootings are perpetrated by shooters who obtain a gun from their homes or the homes of relatives.

In Massachusetts, which has the strictest safe-storage laws in the country, guns are used in just 9 percent of youth suicides, compared with 42 percent nationally. The suicide death rate among youth in the state is 38 percent below the national average.

States with some form of safe storage law

Source: Giffords Law Center

States with some form of safe storage law

Source: Giffords Law Center

The Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence also reports that states requiring locks on handguns in at least some circumstances have 40 percent fewer suicides per capita and 68 percent fewer firearm suicides per capita than states without such laws.

Meanwhile, another safety innovation is being developed: smart guns. These are guns that use fingerprint recognition and other means so that only their owners can fire them. The technology is still relatively new, but it’s promising. One small study found that over seven years, 37 percent of gun deaths could have been prevented by smart guns. Lawmakers could encourage their use by incorporating them into laws regulating safe storage.

Here’s a general rule: The more guns there are, the more gun deaths there will be.

It holds across countries (note how much the United States stands out):

Homicide rates versus gun

ownership among developed

Homicide by firearm rate per 100,000 people

Average firearms per 100 people

Homicide rates versus gun ownership among

Homicide by firearm rate per 100,000 people

Average firearms per 100 people

And across states. One 2013 study from Boston University found that for every percentage point increase in gun ownership at the state level, there was a 0.9 percent rise in the firearm homicide rate.

So how do we reduce the steady flow of guns? Three ideas:

1. Institute a buyback program

In the 1990s, Australia spent $500 million to buy back almost 600,000 guns. Harvard University researchers found that the gun homicide rate dropped 42 percent in the seven years following the law and the gun suicide rate fell 58 percent.

An Australian study found that for every 3,500 guns withdrawn per 100,000 people, the government was able to achieve a 74 percent drop in gun suicides.

In fact, since the ban, the country has not experienced another mass shooting. That doesn’t proves causation. But the likelihood it’s due to chance? Roughly 1 in 200,000, according to a recent paper.

Of course, the United States is different from Australia. The Australian buyback was mandatory, which would probably run into constitutional problems here. Plus, we have way more guns per capita, so the United States would have to spend exponentially more to make a significant difference.

Still, given Australia’s trends, it’s worth at least experimentation. Perhaps the government can use buyback programs to target specific kinds of weapons, such as semiautomatic weapons and large-capacity magazines.

2. Limit the number of guns people can buy at one time

Federal gun enforcers have long warned that state laws allowing bulk purchases of guns enable crime. Older studies from what is now called the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives show that as many as 1 in 5 handguns recovered in a crime were originally purchased as part of a sale in which multiple guns were purchased.

To combat this behavior, some states have instituted “one handgun a month” policies, such as Virginia in 1993. At the time, Virginia was the top supplier of guns seized in the Northeast. Three years later, the state dropped to eighth. Research also shows that the Virginia law was effective in reducing criminal firearms sent to nearby states. It also led to a 35 percent reduction in guns recovered anywhere in the United States that were traced back to Virginia.

Such a policy isn’t going to solve gun trafficking. The Virginia law didn’t prevent “straw purchases” in which traffickers pay people to buy guns legally so they can be sold elsewhere. In fact, Virginia remained the eighth-top supplier of illegal guns even after it repealed its one-handgun-a-month law in 2012.

But experts say one-gun-a-month laws make it more costly for criminals to traffic guns. And given the success in the past, such policies are worth promoting.

3. Hold gun dealers accountable

Research has shown that in some cities, guns used to commit crimes often come from a small set of gun dealers. In Milwaukee, for example, a single dealer was linked to a majority of the guns used in the city’s crime.

So how do we stop the flow of those guns? Hold dealers accountable.

In 1999, the federal government published a report identifying gun shops connected with crime guns, including that Milwaukee dealer. In response to negative publicity, that dealer changed its sales practices. Afterward, the city saw a 76 percent reduction in the flow of new guns from that shop to criminals and a 44 percent reduction in new crime guns overall. But in 2003, Congress passed a law prohibiting the government from publishing such data, after which the rate of new gun sales from that dealer to criminals shot up 200 percent.

Studies show that regulation of licensed dealers — such as record-keeping requirements or inspection mandates — can also reduce interstate trafficking. So can litigation against gun dealers that allow their guns to enter criminal markets. One sting operation conducted by New York City reduced the probability of guns from the dealers they targeted ending up in the hands of criminals by 84 percent.

Strengthen background checks

Federal law requires background checks to obtain a gun, but those checks are extremely porous.

Under federal law, only licensed gun dealers have to perform these background checks. Private individuals and many online retailers don’t. That leaves a lot of gun owners — about 42 percent, according to one survey published in 2017 — who didn’t undergo a background check for a gun purchase. So what happens when states go beyond federal laws and require all handgun sales to undergo a background check? Fewer gun deaths.

Between 2009 and 2012, those states had 35 percent fewer gun deaths per capita than those without the requirement. Those states also have 53 percent fewer firearm suicides and 31 percent fewer overall suicides per capita.