Evacuate Earth - National Geographic Documentary

Evacuate Earth - National Geographic Documentary


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exist countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

We’re the only Pop Archaeology site combining scientific research with out-of-the-box perspectives.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the story of our beginnings.


Age of the Earth

At 4.5 billion years old, it can be difficult to understand just how old Earth is, and the changes that have taken place on the planet in all that time. Looking at some of its life forms, how long they lived, and when they died helps provide some scale of Earth's long existence.

Idea for Use in the Classroom

Earth has existed for 4.5 billion years. In that time, it has undergone amazing transformations as a variety of geologic processes have changed the planet.

Have students read the introduction to the infographic. Ask students, &ldquoWhy does the author use the word &lsquocomplex&rsquo to describe the history of Earth?&rdquo Have students discuss events and concepts that have made Earth&rsquos history complex. Next, ask students how scientists organize different time periods from Earth&rsquos past. Have them look at the chart of different time periods in Earth&rsquos history to find the answer.

Lead a class discussion asking students the following questions:

  1. How many years are tracked on this chart?
  2. What do you notice about the way this chart is organized? (You may have to help students realize the distinction between periods and eras.)
  3. Is the chart to scale? (If students think it is not, have them explain how they could reformat the chart.)
  4. What are significant events that occurred in Earth&rsquos past that show up on the chart?
  5. What time period do you live in?
  6. How do you think scientists are able to determine the relative date of the fossils and rocks they find? (You may need to guide students to understand that the rock layers help scientists determine relative age. Younger rock layers, and material in it, form on top of older rock layers.)

In groups, you can have students compare and contrast different eras or time periods.


Our dance around the sun

Earth orbits the sun once every 365.25 days. Since our calendar years have only 365 days, we add an extra leap day every four years to account for the difference.

Though we can't feel it, Earth zooms through its orbit at an average velocity of 18.5 miles a second. During this circuit, our planet is an average of 93 million miles away from the sun, a distance that takes light about eight minutes to traverse. Astronomers define this distance as one astronomical unit (AU), a measure that serves as a handy cosmic yardstick.

Earth rotates on its axis every 23.9 hours, defining day and night for surface dwellers. This axis of rotation is tilted 23.4 degrees away from the plane of Earth's orbit around the sun, giving us seasons. Whichever hemisphere is tilted closer to the sun experiences summer, while the hemisphere tilted away gets winter. In the spring and fall, each hemisphere receives similar amounts of light. On two specific dates each year—called the equinoxes—both hemispheres get illuminated equally.


Eight new environmental documentaries to watch for 2021

Honeyland, directed by Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov (2019), paints a portrait of North Macedonian beekeepers and their conservation message.

It will perhaps come as no surprise that the idea for Earth Day was born in the late 1960s, during the height of the hippie movement — but today, it’s as much grounded in science as it is ideology. With climate awareness and activism at an all-time high and set to continue growing, the global event — which takes place every 22 April — has never been more celebrated or poignant.

And marking this sea change is the art of documentary filmmaking, holding a mirror to the cultural and political zeitgeist. Recent years have seen the release of several award-winning films, focusing on the issues threatening our natural environment, from the bottoms of the oceans to the very soil we walk upon. Here, we suggest a selection of the best to watch.

1. Seaspiracy, directed by Ali Tabrizi (2021)

The filmmakers who inspired a wave of people to explore or convert to veganism and vegetarianism with Cowspiracy (2014) have turned their unerring focus to the ocean with this new feature-length documentary. Viewers can expect to be faced with some eye-watering facts and statistics surrounding our mistreatment of the world’s oceans. From unsustainable fishing and the dumping of plastics to despicable modern slavery used to provide cheap seafood year-round, this is an unflinching indictment of current practices. Streaming on Netflix

2. Kiss the Ground, directed by Rebecca Harrell Tickell and Josh Tickell (2020)

Earth with a small ‘e’ is the focus of this Woody Harrelson-narrated documentary. While some may regard the forensic analysis of soils and microbes an unsexy topic, this film — which made a splash at the influential Tribeca Film Festival last year — could never be described as dull. The filmmakers craft compelling arguments against modern farming techniques, and simultaneously show how a wiser, more ecological use of the same land could benefit not just the environment, but its farmers, too. Streaming on Netflix

I Am Greta paints a wonderful portrait that offers a more private and empathetic side of the remarkable young woman, Greta Thunberg.

3. I Am Greta, directed by Nathan Grossman (2020)

The image of a stern-looking teen eyeing the last US president with abject disapproval is now an iconic image, as are shots of the Swedish activist sitting on a pavement with a humble sign reading Skolstrejk för klimatet (School strike for climate). While they represent just the tip of the — figuratively speaking — Thunberg, the documentary I Am Greta paints a highly polished portrait that offers a more private and empathetic side of the remarkable young woman, and her struggle to become the voice of a jilted generation. Streaming on BBC iPlayer

4. Honeyland, directed by Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov (2019)

It’s rare for any film to be nominated in two separate categories at the Academy Awards, and more so when it’s for Best Documentary and Best International Feature. Ultimately, Honeyland won neither accolade at the 2020 Oscars, but this beautiful story about North Macedonian beekeepers and their conservation message has been a hit, nonetheless. More subtle than other such ecological films, it demonstrates immense trust between the filmmakers and their affable subjects, while showing a way of life that seems to belong to an altogether different era. Streaming on Amazon Prime and YouTube

5. Ice on Fire, directed by Leila Conners (2019)

The second collaboration between actor and climate champion Leonardo DiCaprio and director Leila Conners is an alarming examination of the potential for global catastrophe at the hands of Arctic thawing. Hearing from ‘climate witnesses’ and progressive scientists around the world, it explains not just the peril we face through inaction but also looks at innovations around the world specialising in carbon capture. As one of the green revolutionaries asks: “Is it game over, or is it in fact game on?” Streaming on Amazon Prime

6. David Attenborough: A Life on our Planet, directed by Alastair Fothergill, Jonathan Hughes and Keith Scholey (2020)

The weight of Sir David Attenborough’s elegiac tone looms large in this feature-length witness statement about his nine decades on Earth. Listening to him explain the unsustainable rise of the human population — and with it, the percentage of CO2 in the atmosphere — can feel dispiriting, but the legendary naturalist’s message isn’t entirely hopeless. As well as mourning what we’ve lost, Attenborough offers sage advice on what we can do to change. Streaming on Netflix

7. My Octopus Teacher, directed by James Reed and Pippa Ehrlich (2020)

Much like pigs, octopuses are intelligent. And much like pigs, octopuses are cursed with being coveted for their tastiness. The cephalopods can seem unrelatable and alien to many, but not so for filmmaker and free-diver Craig Foster, whose special relationship with an octopus off the coast of his native South Africa is the subject of this strange and moving documentary. Foster’s environmental epiphanies and deep connection with his ocean-dwelling friend could be easily mocked if this Oscar-nominated film wasn’t so expertly made. Streaming on Netflix

8. 2040, directed by Damon Gameau (2019)

Considering he’s discussing what could be the worst apocalyptic outcomes of the climate catastrophe, garrulous Australian filmmaker Damon Gameau has a remarkably upbeat temperament in this environmental passion project. Motivated by a desire to create a better world for his daughter, the director and frontman chooses not to pore over the grim minutiae of worst-case scenarios, instead dedicating his film to championing eco measures that already exist. If scaled properly, Gameau argues with admirable sincerity, they could literally save the world. Streaming on Amazon Prime and YouTube


  • OFFICIAL NAME: Russian Federation
  • FORM OF GOVERNMENT: Federation
  • CAPITAL: Moscow
  • POPULATION: 142,122,776
  • OFFICIAL LANGUAGE: Russian
  • MONEY: Ruble
  • AREA: 6,592,772 square miles (17,075,200 square kilometers)
  • MAJOR MOUNTAIN RANGES: Ural, Altay
  • MAJOR RIVERS: Amur, Irtysh, Lena, Ob, Volga, Yenisey

GEOGRAPHY

Russia, the largest country in the world, occupies one-tenth of all the land on Earth. It spans 11 time zones across two continents (Europe and Asia) and has coasts on three oceans (the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic).

The Russian landscape varies from desert to frozen coastline, tall mountains to giant marshes. Much of Russia is made up of rolling, treeless plains called steppes. Siberia, which occupies three-quarters of Russia, is dominated by sprawling pine forests called taigas.

Russia has about 100,000 rivers, including some of the longest and most powerful in the world. It also has many lakes, including Europe's two largest: Ladoga and Onega. Lake Baikal in Siberia contains more water than any other lake on Earth.

Map created by National Geographic Maps

PEOPLE & CULTURE

There are about 120 ethnic groups in Russia who speak more than a hundred languages. Roughly 80 percent of Russians trace their ancestry to the Slavs who settled in the country 1,500 years ago. Other major groups include Tatars, who came with the Mongol invaders, and Ukrainians.

Russia is known all over the world for its thinkers and artists, including writers like Leo Tolstoy and Fyodor Dostoevsky, composers such as Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, and ballet dancers including Rudolf Nureyev.

NATURE

As big as Russia is, it's no surprise that it is home to a large number of ecosystems and species. Its forests, steppes, and tundras provide habitat for many rare animals, including Asiatic black bears, snow leopards, polar bears, and small, rabbit-like mammals called pikas.

Russia's first national parks were set up in the 19th century, but decades of unregulated pollution have taken a toll on many of the country's wild places. Currently, about one percent of Russia's land area is protected in preserves, known as zapovedniks.

Russia's most famous animal species is the Siberian tiger, the largest cat in the world. Indigenous to the forests of eastern Russia, these endangered giants can be 10 feet (3 meters) long, not including their tail, and weigh up to 600 pounds (300 kilograms).

GOVERNMENT & ECONOMY

Russia's history as a democracy is short. The country's first election, in 1917, was quickly reversed by the Bolsheviks, and it wasn't until the 1991 election of Boris Yeltsin that democracy took hold.

Russia is a federation of 86 republics, provinces, territories, and districts, all controlled by the government in Moscow. The head of state is a president elected by the people. The economy is based on a vast supply of natural resources, including oil, coal, iron ore, gold, and aluminum.

HISTORY

The earliest human settlements in Russia arose around A.D. 500, as Scandinavians moved south to areas around the upper Volga River. These settlers mixed with Slavs from the west and built a fortress that would eventually become the Ukrainian city of Kiev.

Kiev evolved into an empire that ruled most of European Russia for 200 years, then broke up into Ukraine, Belarus, and Muscovy. Muscovy's capital, Moscow, remained a small trading post until the 13th century, when Mongol invasions in the south drove people to settle in Moscow.

In the 1550s, Muscovite ruler Ivan IV became Russia's first tsar after driving the Mongols out of Kiev and unifying the region. In 1682, Peter the Great became tsar at the age of ten and for 42 years worked to make Russia more modern and more European.


Evacuate Earth - National Geographic Documentary - History

I recently watched the full two hours of this presentation [Evacuate Earth] and was disappointed in the fact that speculation rapidly degenerated into silliness, and ultimately pseudoscientific nonsense.

In virtually all the elements, the problem was simplistically framed within the context of physics, as if energy and travel in space were the only problems. There were certainly token references to genetic screening [despite the fact that it was largely incorrect and based on some fantasy assumptions]. Surprisingly there was mention of bacteria and then it simply got stupid. Just when I thought there would be a recognition about the difficulties in the microbiome, they concluded that bacteria "travel easy" because they can be kept frozen in a small container.

I guess it just never occurred to them that the bacteria already existed in a "container" their own bodies. However, there wasn't even the illusion of an attempt to address the difficulties that such biological companions would present. Even daunting problems like the food supply were largely dismissed as if it were a temporary problem during space travel that would be readily resolved upon arrival on the new planet. The real silliness came from presuming to transport 250,000 humans, but no means to handle food plants/animals.

In short, programs like this are an embarrassment to science and simply promote the idea that idle speculation based on little more than wishful thinking are valid pursuits.



http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/episodes/evacuate-earth/

I suppose it wouldn't be so bad if it were presented as a speculative discussion, but when serious problems are under-stated. When huge gaps in our knowledge are glossed over as something we can readily solve if we simply focus on it. Perhaps the most disturbing undercurrent in the entire disaster scenario was that it didn't seem to occur to these scientists that their notion of a viable second Earth was little more than childish fantasy. The unmitigated arrogance of their scientific presumptions was as eye-opening as their ignorance.

I'm not big on writing things about myself so a friend on this site (Brian Taylor) opted to put a few sentences together: Hopefully I'll be able.


La Niña

La Nina is a climate pattern that describes the cooling of surface ocean water along the tropical west coast of South America.

Earth Science, Meteorology, Oceanography, Geography, Physical Geography, Mathematics

Photograph courtesy NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

Kicking Up Dust
The impacts of La Niña on our weather and climate have been highly variable throughout history. La Niña delivers drier, warmer, and sunnier weather along the southern tier of the United States, from California to Florida. This weather increases the risk of wildfires in Florida and dryness in the North American plains. The great Dust Bowl drought of the 1930s is thought to have been caused by a decade of La Niña -like conditions and was likely responsible, in part, for the severe drought in the American Midwest in 1988. The 1988-89 La Niña , believed to be one of the most severe in history, has been estimated to cost $40 billion in damages in North America!

the art and science of cultivating land for growing crops (farming) or raising livestock (ranching).

large-scale movement of air that helps distribute thermal energy (heat) on the surface of the Earth.

force per unit area exerted by the mass of the atmosphere as gravity pulls it to Earth.

floating object anchored to the bottom of a body of water. Buoys are often equipped with signals.

to describe the characteristics of something.

all weather conditions for a given location over a period of time.

visible mass of tiny water droplets or ice crystals in Earth's atmosphere.

combination of items, events, or ideas.

to bring different sets of data into order, or establish a relationship or connection between them.

type of animal (an arthropod) with a hard shell and segmented body that usually lives in the water.

steady, predictable flow of fluid within a larger body of that fluid.

(singular: datum) information collected during a scientific study.

system of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

irregular, recurring weather system that features a warm, eastern-flowing ocean current in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

climate pattern in which coastal waters become warmer in the eastern tropical Pacific (El Nio), and atmospheric pressure decreases at the ocean surface in the western tropical Pacific (Southern Oscillation).

having to do with the equator or the area around the equator.

to leave or remove from a dangerous place.

overflow of a body of water onto land.

amount of water vapor in the air.

activity that produces goods and services.

weather system that includes cool ocean temperatures in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

person who studies patterns and changes in Earth's atmosphere.

seasonal change in the direction of the prevailing winds of a region. Monsoon usually refers to the winds of the Indian Ocean and South Asia, which often bring heavy rains.

U.S. Department of Commerce agency whose mission is to "understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans, and coasts to share that knowledge and information with others, and to conserve and manage coastal and marine ecosystems and resources."

substance an organism needs for energy, growth, and life.

set of data used by scientists to measure the differences in normal sea surface temperatures.

flat grasslands of South America.

(singular: phenomenon) any observable occurrence or feature.

(singular: plankton) microscopic aquatic organisms.

animal that hunts other animals for food.

object that orbits around something else. Satellites can be natural, like moons, or artificial.

degree of hotness or coldness measured by a thermometer with a numerical scale.

heat, measured in joules or calories.

winds that blow toward the Equator, from northeast to southwest in the Northern Hemisphere and from southeast to northwest in the Southern Hemisphere.

to pass along information or communicate.

existing in the tropics, the latitudes between the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the south.

process in which cold, nutrient-rich water from the bottom of an ocean basin or lake is brought to the surface due to atmospheric effects such as the Coriolis force or wind.

state of the atmosphere, including temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind, humidity, precipitation, and cloudiness.

Media Credits

The audio, illustrations, photos, and videos are credited beneath the media asset, except for promotional images, which generally link to another page that contains the media credit. The Rights Holder for media is the person or group credited.

Editor

Jeannie Evers, Emdash Editing

Producer

Caryl-Sue, National Geographic Society

Last Updated

For information on user permissions, please read our Terms of Service. If you have questions about how to cite anything on our website in your project or classroom presentation, please contact your teacher. They will best know the preferred format. When you reach out to them, you will need the page title, URL, and the date you accessed the resource.

Media

If a media asset is downloadable, a download button appears in the corner of the media viewer. If no button appears, you cannot download or save the media.

Text on this page is printable and can be used according to our Terms of Service.

Interactives

Any interactives on this page can only be played while you are visiting our website. You cannot download interactives.

Related Resources

Regional Climate

The weather you encounter day to day depends on where you live. Places around the Equator experience warm weather all year round, but experience alternate periods of rainy and dry seasons. Places near lakes may experience more snow in the winter, whereas places on continental plains may be more prone to hail, thunderstorms, and tornados in the summer. The different kinds of weather you might experience in these regions are caused by moving patterns in the Earth&rsquos atmospheric and oceanic circulation, unequal heating of the Earth, and the rotation of the Earth on its tilted axis. Learn more about regional climates with this curated resource collection.

Weather

Weather is the state of the atmosphere, including temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind, humidity, precipitation, and cloud cover. It differs from climate, which is all weather conditions for a particular location averaged over about 30 years. Weather is influenced by latitude, altitude, and local and regional geography. It impacts the way people dress each day and the types of structures built. Explore weather and its impacts with this curated collection of classroom resources.

Climate

Climate describes the average weather conditions of a particular place over a 30 year period . All places on earth have their own climates. Some climates are small in scale, like the climate of a local region or the microclimates within an ecosystem, and some are much larger, such as the climates of entire continents, or the world&rsquos oceans. Different from weather events, which are short-term and temporary phenomenon, climates are usually steady and predictable, and shape how organisms and human civilizations evolve and adapt in any given region. However, climates are not always permanent, and can change drastically due to human activity. Explore the world's climates and how they affect local regions and the planet with this curated collection of resources.

The Ocean and Weather: El Niño and La Niña

Students explore the weather phenomena El Niño and La Niña and their effects, map where they occur, and discuss the benefits of accurately predicting these phenomena.

El Niño

El Nino is a climate pattern that describes the unusual warming of surface waters in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

The Galápagos Bellwether

As El Niños hit the Galápagos Islands with increasing frequency and intensity, due to climate change, the islands' iconic species are under threat.

Related Resources

Regional Climate

The weather you encounter day to day depends on where you live. Places around the Equator experience warm weather all year round, but experience alternate periods of rainy and dry seasons. Places near lakes may experience more snow in the winter, whereas places on continental plains may be more prone to hail, thunderstorms, and tornados in the summer. The different kinds of weather you might experience in these regions are caused by moving patterns in the Earth&rsquos atmospheric and oceanic circulation, unequal heating of the Earth, and the rotation of the Earth on its tilted axis. Learn more about regional climates with this curated resource collection.

Weather

Weather is the state of the atmosphere, including temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind, humidity, precipitation, and cloud cover. It differs from climate, which is all weather conditions for a particular location averaged over about 30 years. Weather is influenced by latitude, altitude, and local and regional geography. It impacts the way people dress each day and the types of structures built. Explore weather and its impacts with this curated collection of classroom resources.

Climate

Climate describes the average weather conditions of a particular place over a 30 year period . All places on earth have their own climates. Some climates are small in scale, like the climate of a local region or the microclimates within an ecosystem, and some are much larger, such as the climates of entire continents, or the world&rsquos oceans. Different from weather events, which are short-term and temporary phenomenon, climates are usually steady and predictable, and shape how organisms and human civilizations evolve and adapt in any given region. However, climates are not always permanent, and can change drastically due to human activity. Explore the world's climates and how they affect local regions and the planet with this curated collection of resources.

The Ocean and Weather: El Niño and La Niña

Students explore the weather phenomena El Niño and La Niña and their effects, map where they occur, and discuss the benefits of accurately predicting these phenomena.

El Niño

El Nino is a climate pattern that describes the unusual warming of surface waters in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

The Galápagos Bellwether

As El Niños hit the Galápagos Islands with increasing frequency and intensity, due to climate change, the islands' iconic species are under threat.


Climate Change

Climate change is a long-term shift in global or regional climate patterns. Often climate change refers specifically to the rise in global temperatures from the mid-20th century to present.

Earth Science, Climatology

Fracking tower

Fracking is a controversial form of drilling that uses high-pressure liquid to create cracks in underground shale to extract natural gas and petroleum. Carbon emissions from fossils fuels like these have been linked to global warming and climate change.

Photograph by Mark Thiessen / National Geographic

Climate is sometimes mistaken for weather. But climate is different from weather because it is measured over a long period of time, whereas weather can change from day to day, or from year to year. The climate of an area includes seasonal temperature and rainfall averages, and wind patterns. Different places have different climates. A desert, for example, is referred to as an arid climate because little water falls, as rain or snow, during the year. Other types of climate include tropical climates, which are hot and humid, and temperate climates, which have warm summers and cooler winters.

Climate change is the long-term alteration of temperature and typical weather patterns in a place. Climate change could refer to a particular location or the planet as a whole. C limate change may cause weather patterns to be less predictable. These unexpected weather patterns can make it difficult to maintain and grow crops in regions that rely on farming because expected temperature and rainfall levels can no longer be relied on. Climate change has also been connected with other damaging weather events such as more frequent and more intense hurricanes, floods, downpours, and winter storms.

In polar regions, the warming global temperatures associated with climate change have meant ice sheets and glaciers are melting at an accelerated rate from season to season. This contributes to sea levels rising in different regions of the planet. Together with expanding ocean waters due to rising temperatures, the resulting rise in sea level has begun to damage coastlines as a result of increased flooding and erosion.

The cause of current climate change is largely human activity, like burning fossil fuels, like natural gas, oil, and coal. Burning these materials releases what are called greenhouse gases into Earth&rsquos atmosphere. There, these gases trap heat from the sun&rsquos rays inside the atmosphere causing Earth&rsquos average temperature to rise. This rise in the planet's temperature is called global warming. The warming of the planet impacts local and regional climates. Throughout Earth's history, climate has continually changed. When occuring naturally, this is a slow process that has taken place over hundreds and thousands of years. The human influenced climate change that is happening now is occuring at a much faster rate.

Fracking is a controversial form of drilling that uses high-pressure liquid to create cracks in underground shale to extract natural gas and petroleum. Carbon emissions from fossils fuels like these have been linked to global warming and climate change.


As more people bring cameras into the water, they are capturing more shocking footage of the most feared and revered ocean.

About National Geographic

Site Information

Top Videos

Top Shows

Top Galleries

Community

RSS feeds

More from Fox International Channels:

© 2019 NGC Europe Limited, All Rights Reserved

You need to install or update your flash player.


<b>Note:</b> after installation, please reload this browser.


Related Documentaries

8.57 The Sun And Other Stars

This documentary looks at the story of stellar evolution and explains the fates of differing types of stars. This includes small stars such as our .

The Ice Hotel of Sweden is the biggest hotel in the world that is built entirely by ice and snow. This hotel is the brainchild of two close friends.

Around the world, a new generation of astronomers are hunting for the most mysterious objects in the universe. Young stars, black holes, even other.

Evacuate Earth is a National Geographic Channel documentary that tells the what-if story of the evacuation of the planet Earth which.


Watch the video: Earth: Making of a Planet National Geographic