Hawker Hurricane IIC of No.87 Squadron

Hawker Hurricane IIC of No.87 Squadron



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Hurricane Aces 1941-45, Andrew Thomas. This book covers the later career of the Hurricane, starting with its final months as a front line fighter in Britain in 1941 before moving on to look at its career in North Africa, the Mediterranean and over the jungles of Burma [see more]


Hawker Hurricane

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Into dark night without a radar

No. 1 Squadron used Hurricanes Mk.IIc since the middle of 1941 and its pilots trained night flying intensively to prepare to fight German night Blitz, still problematic since the end of the Battle of Britain. Before the radar-equipped night fighter became a standard, RAF tried different methods of defence. The easiest one was to change a day fighter squadron into night fighter and sent its pilots for lone night patrols.

The ground control was not often precise and a Hurricane pilot hunting at night for German bombers mainly had to take pot luck and trust his senses. However, the sight was not always the most important of them. Pilots often mentioned that the reaction of their aircraft for turbulences caused by enemy aircraft helped them to discover it. At the beginning of 1942, RAF decided to extend the ineffective tactics of destroying enemy bombers on their way to targets and started attacking enemy planes in and around their bases. The RAF had tried it earlier, but a relatively short range of British fighters limited the tactics effectively.


The Birth of Hurricane Mk.IIc

At the same time Hakwer was working on greater firepower. RAF had already had some experience with weapon stronger than .303 inch machine guns. The chosen option was 20mm Hispano Suiza cannon, but it required major redesigning of a wing. Instead of one gun baywith four machine guns there were two separate gun bays for one cannon each witch a shute case at the lower wing. Each gun bay hatch had a bulge covering drum feed for Hispano cannons. Another characteristic feature were anti-glare panels installed just over and aft the exhausts. These were rectangular metal panels protecting pilots eyes from exhaust glare during night missions. Hurricane Mk IIc, Z3899/JX-W, 1 Sqaudron RAF, November 1941. Aeroplane painted with Day Fighter Scheme, upper surfaces in Dark Green and Ocean Grey, under surfaces in Sea Grey Medium. Early insignia type A1 and early fin flash. Unusual Sky band on fuselage, with slot for serial. Artwork by Zbyszek Malicki.


Hawker Hurricane IIC of No.87 Squadron - History

The Hawker Hurricane is a British single-seat fighter aircraft of the 1930s–1940s that was designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd.

The Hawker Hurricane is a low-wing cantilever monoplane outfitted with retractable undercarriage and an enclosed cockpit for the pilot. A clean, single-seat fighter, it was developed to provide a competent combatant for aerial combat against the latest fighter designs that were emerging amongst the air services of other powers of the era. The Hurricane was initially armed with an arrangement of eight remotely-operated wing-mounted Browning machine guns, intended for conducting rapid engagements. The Hurricane was typically equipped for flying under both day and night conditions, being provided with navigation lights, Harley landing lights, complete blind-flying equipment, and two-way radios. Upon its entry to service, much of the performance data was intentionally concealed from the general public, but it was known that the type possessed a speed range of 6:1.

Though faster and more advanced than the RAF's current front line biplane fighters, the design of the Hurricane's construction was already considered to be somewhat outdated when introduced to service and resembled those used on the earlier biplanes.[ Hawker had decided to employ its traditional construction techniques instead of radical measures such as the adoption of a stressed-skin metal exterior. The primary structure comprised a Warren truss box-girder that made use of high-tensile steel longerons and duralumin cross-bracing, which were mechanically fastened instead of welded. Over this, a secondary structure composed of wooden formers and stringers gave the fuselage a rounded external shape, which carried a doped linen covering. The majority of the external surfaces were linen, save for a section between the cockpit and the engine cowling that used lightweight metal panels instead

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Hawker
Hawker Huricane Mk.IIC

Due to its lightweight, yet robust, construction and ease of maintenance, the Hurricane had a long operational life in many theatres of war. It was also built by, or exported to, several other countries. The Hurricane was unusual in that it was flown operationally by both the Allies and the Axis during the war. In some cases (e.g. Portugal and Ireland) the Hurricane was pressed into service after being forced to land in a neutral country.

National origin United Kingdom

Manufacturer Hawker Aircraft

First flight 6 November 1935

First flight 6 November 1935

Introduction 25 December 1937

Variants Hawker Hurricane variants

You are definitely intrigued to discover Huricane Mk.IIC .

Hurricane Mk IIA Series 1 equipped with new and slightly longer propeller spinner, and fully replaced the machine-gun armament with four 20 mm (.79 in) Hispano Mk II cannons, two per side. Hurricane IIA Series 2 became the Mk IIC in June 1941, using a slightly modified wing. The new wings also included a hardpoint for a 500 or 250 lb (230 or 110 kg) bomb and, later in 1941, fuel tanks. By then performance was inferior to the latest German fighters, and the Hurricane changed to the ground-attack role, sometimes referred to as the Hurribomber.

The Hurricane had its first combat action on 21 October 1939, at the start of the Phoney War. That day, “A” Flight of 46 Squadron took off from North Coates satellite airfield, on the Lincolnshire coast, and was directed to intercept a formation of nine Heinkel He 115B floatplanes from 1/K


Hawker Hurricane IIC of No.87 Squadron - History

Constructed as a Hurricane IIC.

Taken on Strength/Charge with the Royal Air Force with s/n LF363.

To The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, RAF Coningsby, Coningsby, Lincolnshire/Lincs, England.
View the Location Dossier

Markings Applied: LE-D
Painted in the markings of 242 Squadron which, during the Battle of Britain, was based at RAF Coltishall under the command of Douglas Bader.


Photographer: Peter Nicholson
Notes: This Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Hurricane IIC attended the 1972 RAF Leuchars Airshow.


Photographer: Unknown Photographer


Photographer: Unknown Photographer


Photographer: Peter Nicholson
Notes: The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Hurricane II seen on a visit to Southend-on-Sea, Essex.


Photographer: Paul Thallon
Notes: Photo taken at Prestwick Airport.


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RAF Brize Norton Airshow


Photographer: Paul Thallon
Notes: 1983 photo of Hawker Hurricane IIC at Greenham Common


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RAF Abingdon Battle of Britain Day


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RAF St Mawgan Airshow


Photographer: Peter Nicholson
Notes: This Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Hurricane IIC attended the 1988 RAF Mildenhall Air Fete.

Markings Applied: GN-A
Painted in the markings of Flight Lieutenant James Brindley Nicolson (VC), RAF No.249 Squadron, Boscombe Down, 16th August 1940.


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RNAS Yeovilton Airshow


Photographer: Robert Nichols

Crashed.
Crashed on landing at RAF Wittering following an engine failure.

Contracted to Historic Flying Ltd, Audley End for work on the airframe.

Restored.
Markings Applied: US-C
The work was carried out by Historic Flying.


Photographer: Ken Videan
Notes: In the 100 Years of Flight enclave at RIAT Fairford.


Photographer: David Miller
Notes: At Duxford, UK

Markings Applied: JX-B, P3395
Painted to represent a Hurricane Mk 1, the personal aircraft of Sergeant Pilot Arthur Darkie Clowes DFM, of No 1 Squadron during the Battle of Britain.


Photographer: Thomas Delvoye
Notes: RAF Fairford, UK

Markings Applied: GN-F, S
Each side now painted in different markings.


Hawker Hurricane IIC of No.87 Squadron - History

Constructed as a Hurricane IIC.
Built at Hawkers factory at Langley. Last of 14,533 Hurricanes built

Taken on Strength/Charge with the Royal Air Force with s/n PZ865.
Was bought by Hawker Aircraft Ltd before entering service.

To Hawker Aircraft Ltd, Kingston on Thames.
Put into storage at Langley.

From 1 May 1950 to 1 July 1963

To Hawker Aircraft Ltd, Kingston on Thames with new c/r G-AMAU.
Entered into the Kings Cup Race and came second.

From 1 July 1963 to 19 December 1972

To Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd, Kingston on Thames keeping c/r G-AMAU.

Taken on Strength/Charge with the Royal Air Force with s/n PZ865.

To The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, RAF Coningsby, Coningsby, Lincolnshire/Lincs, England.
View the Location Dossier

Markings Applied: DT A
Markings represent Squadron Leader R.Stanford-Tucks aircraft with 257 (Burma) Squadron in 1940.


Photographer: Unknown Photographer


Photographer: Peter Nicholson
Notes: Hurricane IIC of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight taking off at the 1975 RAF Church Fenton Airshow


Photographer: Peter Nicholson
Notes: Hurricane IIC of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight on display at the 1977 RAF Leuchars Airshow.

Markings Applied: JU-Q
Early WWII scheme, black and white split undersurfaces. In 111 Sqn markings.


Photographer: Peter Nicholson
Notes: The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Hurricane IIC on static display at the 1978 RAF Waddington Airshow.


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RAF Mildenhall Air fete


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RAF Finningley Battle of Britain Air Day

Markings Applied: The Last of the Many


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RAF Greenham Common IAT83


Photographer: Al Clegg

Markings Applied: RF-U
303(Polish)Sqn markings representing aircraft flown by Sgt Joseph Frantisek.


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RAF Mildenhall Air Fete 89


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RAF St Mawgan Airshow


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: At RAF Mildenhall Air Fete 1993.


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at Duxford Airshow

Markings Applied: Q
WWII SE Asia colour scheme.


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RNAS Culdrose Air Show


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RNAS Culdrose Airshow

Markings Applied: JX-E
Colour scheme of Night Reaper JX-E, (BE581) which was flown by Flight Lieutenant Karel Kut Kuttlewascher, who was a Czech fighter ace. BE581 was flown during night intruder operations by Flight Lieutenant Karel Kut Kuttlewascher who shot down 15 enemy bombers in 15 missions from Tangmere in 1942, he went on to achieve 18 kills during the war.The reproduction of BE581 JX-E faithfully reproduced Night Reaper on the starboard engine cowl. Also, the eleven swastikas representing his kills up to the 5th May 1942 when he scored three kills in one night were on the port side by the canopy. The replacement Rudder and port wing panel on BE581, which came from a Turbinlite Hurricane, were represented by being painted black.


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: At RNAS Yeovilton Air Show


Photographer: Peter Nicholson
Notes: This Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Hurricane IIC seen on a re-fuelling stop at Carlisle.

Markings Applied: EG-S
Replicating Hurricane Mk IIC HW840, coded EG-S, of 34 Squadron, South East Asia Command during 1944, the personal aircraft of Canadian pilot, Flight Lieutenant Jimmy Whalen DFC.Sadly, Jimmy lost his life on 18 April 1944, 5 days before his 24th birthday, during the Battle for Kohima. He had carried out 176 sorties against the enemy, 107 being over enemy territory and 23 at night. He had to his credit 3 ME-109s destroyed and 1 damaged whilst flying from England and 3 Japanese Navy Val Type 99s destroyed over Ceylon.


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: RAF Leuchars Air Show


Photographer: Thomas Delvoye
Notes: RAF Fairford, UK


Photographer: Robert Nichols
Notes: at RNAS Yeovilton Airshow


Photographer: Robert Nichols


Photographer: Robert Nichols



Night Hurricanes – Hawker Hurricane decals by Eagle Strike

In 2002, Eagle Strike released a set of markings for night intruder Hurricanes, Set No. 48124, that provide four striking versions of the Hurricane Mk.IIc employed from 1941-42, carrying the war to the enemy at a time when the British Empire was fighting for its very survival in the Mediterranean and North Africa.

Eagle Strike have produced a set of decals for early to mid-war Hawker Hurricanes used as night intruders in 1/48 scale.

The four versions are:
1.Hawker Hurricane Mk IIc Serial no. BE500 LK-A flown by Squadron Leader Smallwood, DFC, 87 Squadron RAF, Charmy Down, early 1942. 87 squadron was one of the first to convert to night fighter operations. Squadron Leader Smallwood led the squadron between 1941-42, when most intercepts were made entirely without on-board radar. Aircraft painted in overall black scheme known in the RAF as “Special Night.”

2. Hawker Hurricane Mk II Serial no. Z3092 QO-T, of 3 Squadron RAF, Stapleford, Tawney, September 1941. At that time Z3092 was camouflaged in an interim day fighter scheme of Dark Sea Grey and Dark Green upper surfaces, with Sea Grey undersides. Like 87 Squadron, 3 Squadron was one of the first to commence Intruder operations.

3. Hawker Hurricane Mk IIc Serial No. Z3971 SW-S “Samastimans II” of 253 Squadron, RAF, Highbalstow, late 1941. At that time, 253 Squadron was tasked with the night defence of the Midlands region of the UK. Also painted in overall Special Night.

4. Hawker Hurricane Mk IIc Serial No. HL864 LK-?, used in night intruder operations during September 1942. Camouflage pattern of Dark Sea Grey and Dark Green upper surfaces with Special Night undersides.

Eagle Strike’s sheet comes with color profiles of the four aircraft and further details on their individual service, as well as a full color paint guide for all aircraft. Highly recommended.


File:Hawker Hurricane Mk IIC of No. 166 Wing in flight from Chittagong in India, May 1943. CI191.jpg

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Watch the video: Hawker Hurricane Mk. IIc-242 Squadron RAF-Malta, October 4th. 1941